Membership and Policy Council Elections

MPC 2019 Elections

Forest Stewards Guild professional members in good standing have the opportunity to elect three representatives to the Guild's Membership and Policy Council. The MPC 1) supervises the development of Guild policy and position statements and the modification of our mission and principles, 2) addresses issues related to membership and member services, and 3) selects the members of the Membership and Nominating Committee in conjunction with the Board of Directors. 

Voting for the 2019 election runs through Wednesday, December 5, 2018. Professional members have been emailed ballot instructions. Contact Colleen Robinson at colleen@forestguild.org or call 505-983-8992 if you haven't received your ballot or have questions regarding the election. We thank the following candidates for their willingness to serve.

Alex Barrett Michael Mangum
Richard Campbell Robert Northrop
Justin Hart Julius Pasay
Emily Huff Klaus Puettmann
Christel Kern Bruce White
Amy LaBarge PDF of candidate bios and statements

Alex Barrett, Saxtons River, VT

Biography
I grew up in North Egremont, Massachusetts. My family ran a sawmill and then a hardwood flooring mill. After going to Middlebury College and then teaching high school Spanish for 3 years, I re-engaged with forest management and went back to school to earn a Master of Forestry degree from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies in 2012. Then I worked for 2 ½ years as Yale's School Forests Manager where I oversaw 11,000 acres of working forest in Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Vermont. In 2014, I began working as a consulting forester at Long View Forest in Westminster, VT collaborating with a team of foresters, loggers, and ecological restoration specialists in an integrated forest management company. I am a licensed forester in New Hampshire and Vermont, and a Certified Forester in Connecticut. I live in Saxtons River, VT with my family and enjoy splitting firewood, exploring nearby forests by foot and on bike, learning my birds, and learning to hunt.
 
Candidate Statement
I lead the forestry division at Long View Forest in Westminster, Vermont where I focus on creative, comprehensive forestry and land management with our mostly smaller, family ownerships. In that work, I humbly try to apply good silviculture in largely restorative settings pairing invasive plant control, young forest tending, infrastructure improvements, and financial modeling with solid silviculture and a lot of time working directly with landowners in an educational and consulting capacity. With the MPC, I strive to bring a similarly humble and collaborative approach as I work with our membership and MPC on the important issues we confront.  

Last spring, when I had the opportunity to speak to a committee of our State legislature about forest fragmentation, I was empowered and guided by the work we had recently done in the MPC around that topic and felt the very real connections between our work and the policy-making realm that constantly impacts all the work we do as Guild members out there in the forest. I hope to continue my work on the MPC- to maintain these policy statement-policy making connections as well as to help invigorate our Model Forest Program.  

I appreciate the guidance and support that the community of Guild foresters has given me and I am eager and hopeful to, in turn, continue my contributions to this community as part of the Membership and Policy Council. Thank you for your consideration.

Richard Campbell, Berkeley, CA

Biography
Richard Campbell doesn’t get out to the woods nearly enough anymore. He spends most of his time these days on a computer or the phone, or around a table, working with private landowners, public agencies, and the research community to better protect and steward the redwood forests of California. His work takes him from the temperate rainforest of the coast to the giant sequoia groves of the Sierra Nevada and from plantations to ancient groves. Before his current job at Save the Redwoods League, Richard spent five years managing the Yale University demonstration and research forests in Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Vermont. He sold timber, led an apprentice forester program, served as the Connecticut SAF chair, and helped establish the Quiet Corner Initiative. His shelterwoods all regenerated prolifically. Richard has taught kids in Chicago, dug holes and set fires for AmeriCorps, and split firewood in many different states. He has a Master of Forestry degree from Yale and has been a Guild member since 2007. Richard lives in Berkeley, California with his wife, daughters, dog, and fish.

Candidate Statement
The Guild’s values and commitment to putting the forest first is fundamental to my work and my approach to forestry. I rely on the Guild’s principles every day, whether it’s negotiating a working forest conservation easement, planning a restoration thinning, or marking a timber stand. The conversations I have with fellow Guild members are a glad reminder of our shared ethos, and each time I learn something new and have a good laugh. The more Guild members have and take opportunities to share our experiences and our knowledge, the wiser we can be as a community. Forestry is becoming more complex and the world is becoming smaller. The voice of the Guild is a valuable one as our work is more and more a part of a larger conversation. I would like to help the MPC be a way for our community to have that voice. 

Justin Hart, Tuscaloosa, AL

Biography
Justin Hart is Associate Professor and Director of the Environmental Science Program at the University of Alabama. He is also the Director of the UA Forest Dynamics Lab. The primary mission of the Forest Dynamics Lab is to conduct research that directly improves the management of our forest resources. Justin’s primary research interests are forest stand dynamics and forest disturbance ecology. The results of his studies are used to guide forest management, especially in the realm of natural disturbance-based silviculture and forest restoration. Justin is currently Associate Editor for the journal Forest Science and on the Editorial Boards for the journals Forest Ecology and Management, Forestry, and Forests. He teaches classes in forest ecology, silviculture, forest restoration, and forest measurements. In 2017, Justin worked with UA students to create the UA Student Chapter of the Forest Stewards Guild. The UA Student Chapter has worked on local service projects such as trail building and tree planting, and is actively promoting Guild principles on campus and in the community.

Candidate Statement
In 2011, I gave an invited presentation at a Guild-sponsored conference on forest restoration in Sewanee, Tennessee. I realized then that the Forest Stewards Guild was a group to which I wanted to belong and invest. I joined as a professional member in 2012. My personal environmental ethics are aligned with Guild principles. As an educator, I use the Guild principles in my classes to provide the philosophical foundation for the courses I teach. In particular, I would like to help the Guild recruit student members and establish official student chapters. I would also like to assist the Guild in reaching faculty and students at non-traditional forestry schools, like my own. In my opinion, environmental science and natural resources management programs, in addition to traditional forestry programs, would be well served by a group of students committed to Guild principles. A central challenge is to maintain student membership and active involvement in the Guild after graduation, and I would like to work with others on this and other issues.  

Emily Huff, Lansing, MI

Biography
Dr. Emily Huff holds a M.S. in Natural Resource Science and Management from the University of Minnesota and a PhD in Forestry from the University of Maine. She began her post-graduate career in the US Forest Service, working on the National Woodland Owner Survey – an instrument used to measure and track the attitudes, intentions, and behaviors of private family and individual forest owners. She then moved to a faculty position at Michigan State University where she teaches and researches human dimensions of forestry. This entails understanding decision-making, environmental behavior, and the effect of policies on forests. Emily has an Extension appointment at MSU, and currently focuses on the Women Owning Woodlands network and building E-learning content about forest carbon management. Emily is currently on the Board of Directors for the Michigan Forest Foundation, an educational foundation that provides scholarship money for students in forestry and promotes private forest landowner education and outreach. She is serves as the newsletter coordinator for the SAF B1 Private Forestry working group. Emily grew up mostly in New England, but now lives on 6 acres of woodland in Lansing, Michigan with her husband and dog. 

Candidate Statement 
In my natural resources and forestry research career, I’ve collaborated with and known many Guild members, all of whom I hold in the highest regard. I am an applied researcher specializing in the human dimensions of forestry, so everything I do must have relevance to policy or management goals. The Guild’s mission of “putting the forest first” is a wonderfully simple message for policymaking. The simple question then becomes, “does this help keep forests as forests?” My research and Extension focus all center around forest landowner engagement – skills which translate to expanding and retaining Guild membership and providing strong and relevant member services. My daily interaction with undergraduate and graduate students also keeps my focus on recruitment and retention to the profession. I’d like to contribute to a mentoring program whereby professional Guild members meet regularly with forestry students to open new pathways and opportunities for the next generation of Forest Stewards Guild members. I’m also active in the Women Owning Woodlands professional network. The Guild already plays a large role in this initiative and continued involvement will position Guild members to assist and support a growing segment of private landowners.

Christel Kern, Rhinelander, WI

Biography
Dr. Christel Kern has been a research forester for the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station for 7 years. Prior, she served in technical and professional science services in forest monitoring and research for 10 years in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, and Washington. She received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point and her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Kern leads and develops research-management partnerships to address critical knowledge gaps in sustainable forest management for current and anticipated future conditions of northern forests. This includes conducting the full research cycle of idea development, grant proposal writing, experimentation, analysis, synthesis, publication, and outreach. In addition, she manages five experimental forests in the Lake States and coordinates 80 Research Natural Areas in the northeastern U.S. 

Candidate Statement 
Sustaining forests for tomorrow and generations to come is critical, especially in light of current and unforeseen future challenges to forest sustainability. The Forest Guild is a visionary yet practical foundation to meet this goal. At a personal and member level, the mission of the Forest Guild and its approach to sustainability resonates strongly with me. I hope to bring this inspiration to a new level this year by serving on the Membership and Policy Committee (MPC). My participation on the MPC would be an honor and a welcomed challenge. I offer the membership and MPC my professional expertise and core values of integrity, accountability, and respect. As a member of MPC, my strengths in interpersonal skills, leveraging diversity, and optimism will facilitate team to obtain its goals. In addition, my perspective will diversify the MPC’s group-think processes with my Lakes States, mid-career, and female professional experiences, which is a currently under-represented viewpoint on the 9-member committee. I envision my service would contribute to well-vetted, creative outcomes from the MPC for the membership, profession, and sustainable forest management. 

Amy LaBarge, North Bend, WA

Biography
Amy LaBarge is the Natural Resources Manager for the 100,000 acres of forest land that comprise Cedar River and the South Fork Tolt River Municipal Watersheds that the City of Seattle owns and manages to provide high quality water supply for people and fish in the Seattle metropolitan area. Amy received a Master’s degree in Ecosystem Science and Conservation from the University of Washington, College of Forest Resources in 1996, and a professional certificate in Decision Making for Climate Change in 2011. She conducted her master’s research in the Cedar River Municipal Watershed investigating the effects of alternative silvicultural systems, such as variable retention, on the soil ecosystem, regeneration and biodiversity. Amy has provided forest stewardship educational programs and technical consultation with non-industrial private forest landowners in Washington State and has conducted forest research with the University of California at Berkeley in young coast redwood forests.

Candidate Statement
I strive to manage Seattle’s forested watersheds to protect water quality and to improve ecosystem function, biological diversity, and habitat complexity for a range of fish and wildlife species. I guide the Watershed Natural Resources team in implementing forest habitat and stream restoration, invasive species management, fish, wildlife and ecosystem monitoring and climate adaptation. I value the role of education and research in the municipal watersheds to develop a skilled and diverse pool of ecosystem management professionals and to inform watershed management strategies into the future. I would be honored to serve on the Forest Guild Membership and Policy Council to build membership and focus on forest research and management priorities. 

Michael Mangum, Toms River, NJ

Biography
Michael Mangum is the Director of the Ocean County Park System which primarily is located in the Pinelands of South Jersey. He has a BS from the University of Vermont in Park Management and has 41 years’ experience studying the NJ Pine Barrens and managing public lands. He is responsible for the management of over 25,000 acres of land, most of which is forest in moderate to extreme fire regimes. Michael is a special district fire warden with the NJ Forest Fire Service and a member of the Ocean County Shade Tree Commission. He is also past president of the NJ Natural Resource Education Foundation and past chairman of the Little Egg Harbor Environmental Commission. He is a member of the Society of American Foresters, NJ Shade Tree Federation and the Forest History Society.

Candidate Statement
I joined the Forest Stewards Guild a number of years ago because I share the Guild’s core philosophy of practicing sustainable forestry through education, research and stewardship. I believe to understand how to manage our forests now and into the future we need to study the past, how ecologically they developed, how they changed over time, man’s impact including past management practices. We need the best science available to adapt our forests to climate change, manage invasive species and better understand the roll fire plays in many of our forests. Above all it is important to engage in education at all levels to build public understanding and support for ecologically based forestry. One of the best things the Guild continues to do is provide regional workshops. The MPC plays an important role in all of the above which sets the stage for the direction the Forest Stewards Guild will take in the future. 

Robert Northrop, Seffner, FL

Biography
Robert Northrop has a B.S. in forest management from VA Tech and a M.S. in wildlife ecology from the Univ. of Delaware. He has worked as a forester for 40 years. Presently he is an extension forester for the University of Florida IFAS Extension where the focus of his work involves teaching forest conservation; providing conservation planning assistance to local, state and federal governments; and applied research into the changing character and ecological function of the Tampa Bay Watershed’s urbanizing forest. Before coming to Florida he worked for the State of Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay Restoration Program as a watershed forester; the Maryland Office of the Governor as an advisor, leading an appointed group of political, natural resource agency and industry leaders in the development of policy and programmatic initiatives concerning forest and wildlife conservation; and the University of Delaware where he taught wildlife management for 14 years. He has co-authored 12 peer-reviewed publications on forest conservation and management.

Candidate Statement
As foresters and natural resource professionals, we are witnessing the effects of global population growth and urban expansion. Forest systems are being increasingly stressed by demands for goods and services, which raise many difficult questions. How do we maintain our social institutions and a healthy economy without depleting or degrading our forest resources? Can we develop and grow while maintaining healthy forests for our children and grandchildren? There are no easy answers to questions like these, but we must begin to deal with them using the best information we have right now. 

With complex issues it is useful to find a touchstone. We do this by going back to the basics of applying ecological principles to guide the sustainable management of forest systems across the range from the wilderness to our cities, linking ecological, social and economic issues and opportunities, while recognizing that forests are an integral and functional part of larger ecosystems. As we, the Forest Stewards Guild, practice sound forestry within the 21st century – the Anthropocene – we need to diligently focus attention on the development and implementation of forest policy and law, which now reflects the values of our nation’s overwhelmingly urban population. We need to be a recognized, reputable and sought after voice of reason, to ensure that the continued use and benefits coming from the forest are understood as only possible within the constraints and limits imposed by the Earth’s forest ecosystems themselves. 

Julius Pasay, Portland, OR

Biography
Julius Pasay works to support ecological forest management and land conservation using carbon-based finance at The Climate Trust in Portland, OR. Prior to his current role, Julius studied traditional agroforestry techniques as a Fulbright scholar in France to assess their applicability to temperate North American ecosystems. Julius was the Forest Manager for the Yale School Forests in New England where he managed forest operations, worked with community forest owners, and educated student foresters. Other natural resource work includes stints in the commercial lobster fishery and organic vegetable farming. Julius holds a M.F. from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and a B.A. in Earth and Environmental Science from Wesleyan University.

Candidate Statement
I believe strongly in the principles of the Guild, its potential to continue creating local communities of stewardship, and its ability to be a strong voice for excellent forestry as we move into an era of environmental uncertainty. I would like to build upon the great work already being performed on the Membership and Policy Council to support and encourage further community building in our regions. Forestry is inherently a community and place-based practice. Strong ties between regional foresters, land managers and conservationists encourages collaboration and partnerships that can amplify our impact on regional silviculture and conservation. As a forester now working on carbon and conservation finance, I understand how important it is to build relationships between these different groups to achieve our shared goals. I look forward to the opportunity to bring this perspective to the Membership and Policy Council to strengthen our local communities of forest stewards and effectively encourage excellent forestry in all our regions. 

Klaus Puettmann, Corvallis, OR

Biography
Klaus J. Puettmann is Edmund Hayes Professor in Silviculture Alternatives in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University. Growing up on a forest farm in Germany and receiving a Diploma (Forest Science) from the Albert-Ludwig University, Freiburg, Germany in 1986 provided a solid basis in traditional forestry practices. Klaus’ interst expanded beyond that approach and he choose development of mixed species stands for his Ph.D. thesis topic (Silviculture, Forest Modeling) in 1990 at Oregon State University, even though plenty people in Oregon told him he is “wasting his time” on that topic. Since then he has focused his professional career in research and teaching focused on silviculture and stand development of diverse structured forests. Klaus has worked in several research and teaching positions at the University of Minnesota and Oregon State University and sabbatical visits at the University of Freiburg and Harvard Forests. His research projects and teachings of management approaches  align well with the principles of the Forest Steward Guild. Klaus is continuing to pursue this work including as a faculty liaison for the recently established Forest Steward Guild student chapter at OSU. 

Candidate Statement
I have been working on topics closely related to the principles of the FSG for most of my career. Throughout this time FSG members have been important stimulations and critics of my efforts. I have found the FSG community to be both creative and critical. Their input and feedback has added a great deal to my professional success and personal satisfaction of my work. During my involvement in in educational events in classrooms, at the university, or at other local, regional, national, and international events, I realized that many landowners and foresters are struggling with the same issue: how to economically manage forests that provides a wide variety of benefits to nature, owners, and society. I also sense that some people feel isolated in this context and feel that they don’t receive sufficient support from educational and research organization and society in general. This tells me that many more people could benefit from interactions with FSG members.  I see great opportunity through my work to increase the membership and more importantly to positively influence management practices in forests. At the same time, the FSG will benefit from bringing in a broader section of “foresters” with a different set views and approaches land management. One example of this was in my experience establishing the student chapter at OSU. Once students learned about the FSG, it became an “easy sale” and students with a diversity of backgrounds got involved. To sum it up: I like to think that I can help broadening the membership, use my position at OSU to encourage especially young, aspiring “foresters” to learn from and participate in the FSG, and make the Pacific Northwest chapter a vibrant, effective community. 

Bruce White, Raleigh, NC

Biography
I began working with Gelbert & Company Forestry Consultants of Durham, North Carolina as a technician during the summers in junior high and high school. Upon graduation from North Carolina State University with a BS in Forestry in 1993, I began an eleven year career with Willamette Industries in Chester, SC both as procurement and a land management forester, working in the Piedmont of South and North Carolina. I began to specialize in natural stand and wildlife habitat management on the company land base during this time. In 2004, I started my own consulting business, White Oak Forest Management, in Chester, helping private landowners manage their land for multiple use benefits. I also contracted services to other consulting firms such as Gelbert & Co. and their successor, Gelbert, Fullbright, Edwards & Randolph. In March of 2007 I joined Gelbert, Fullbright & Randolph Forestry Consultants, PLLC and I am now working with the private landowner client base in both North and South Carolina out of the Raleigh office. 

Candidate Statement
I am honored to have been asked to run for a second term on the MPC. I have enjoyed my first term and have been able to contribute to the multi-faceted efforts the Council has undertaken since my first term began in 2016. I accepted the nomination to run for the Council in order to continue to do my part to contribute to the Guild mission and to help represent the Southeast region, where membership is not as robust as other areas of the country.

I am a member of the Guild for two reasons. First, the Guild promotes ecological, ethical, and science-based forestry. Second, it is the only professional forestry organization that truly encourages interaction and support among its membership regarding alternatives to status quo silvicultural practices. I will take every opportunity to foster constructive communication amongst the membership, in order to keep that “spark” alive that drew us all to join the Guild originally.

I believe the Guild can be a strong voice in advocating ecological forestry in venues where that voice may otherwise be weak. I will encourage and support Guild policy development and position statements that address state or regional issues of concern regarding resource management.